‘Pussy Riot’ – How Freedom Brings Change

February 14, 2014 11:15 am

A spectre is haunting Russia — the spectre of totalitarianism. While everything seemed set and ready for the first ever Winter Olympic Games in the country; the human rights activists from ‘Pussy Riot’ believe more important issues need the President’s attention, such as the promotion of togetherness and tolerance.

Pussy_Riot_by_Igor_Mukhin

‘Pussy Riot’ became known with their provocative and scandalous video filmed in the Russian Cathedral. Back in 2012, the girls of the group danced and sang offensive lyrics to Putin. This initiative hit the right target, as, since then the Russian Church has had an enormous influence on the decision-making of the Federation. The campaign appeared as a radical attempt of breaking into the prohibited canon tightly associated with the Russian identity.

The reactions reported by federal media caused by the controversial video showed low approval and lack of credibility. However, the Pussy Rioters are confident that the majority supported the views they promote, and that what media shows is artificially manufactured. The females claimed to represent the common resistance against Putin’s domestic policy across Russian society, creating an inspiration for others and showing surprising bravery for a group of young people.

Despite the lack of political allies that Pussy Rioters occupy in Russia, it seems their cause has supporters worldwide. The pop icon Madonna showed sympathy to their ideas by sharing the stage with the two Pussy Rioters, Nadya, 24 and Masha, 25 who performed alongside her at the Amnesty International Concert in New York on January 29th.

Out of prison, the Pussy Rioters took a trip to US in order to enrich their knowledge and share experience with colleagues, believing this would improve their protesting methods and mobilization for the future. Activists will apply the new skills gained from this cultural exchange to their continuing combat against social and political issues in Russia.

In interview with news veteran Christiana Amanpour, they announced that the new course they are heading into is “the protection of prisoner’s rights”. As it is widely known, the members of the protest movement became political prisoners in penal camps in Russia after their contentious campaign at the Russian Cathedral.

Three members of the Pussy Riot girl band behind bars during a court hearing in 2012

After the jail failed to condemn ‘Pussy Riot’, the females are back in town, set with a new mission in action. This new campaign takes the form of a human rights organization titled ‘Zone of Law’. This is planned to deal with prisoner’s rights in Russia, with the intention of expanding the spectrum beyond Russian borders. The protection of prisoners will be accomplished through rebellions against unpaid labels and exploitation, violence used by administration and its servants, health care and medical accessibility.

In response to provocative comments on potential consequences after their return to Russia, the activists from ‘Pussy Riot’ state: “we are free people and free people feel no fear”, and believe they have indeed proved their right to preach. Despite the fact that being thrown back into jail is highly potential, this is not a powerful enough reason for the young girls to resist returning to Russia and continuing their crusade.

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